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Hungarians don’t trust in mainstream medicine

Hungarians don’t trust in mainstream medicine

According to a recent survey by Závecz Research, Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed believe that alternative healing methods are much more effective than scientific methods and regard the phenomenon of “Pharmaceutical Lobby” an obscenity.

68 percent of respondents believe that drug companies, in order to increase their profits subvert treasured and affordable natural therapies. The survey found that there was a huge demand for alternative medical solutions among the general public and distrust in official medical procedures is greater than ever before.

More than half of Hungarians support alternative medicine and only 13 percent of them are skeptical; a third of them ambivalent.

The survey also found that 27 percent of respondents believe that vaccines cause more harm than good. This means that more than two million people in Hungary do not believe that vaccination is a good thing.

Also, three-quarters of respondents believe that the key to good health is regular detoxification.

More than 80 percent of respondents agree with the statement that the majority of diseases have psychological origin and must be treated accordingly – drugs or medical intervention can’t cure them.

Support of alternative medicine in the 18 to 29 age group is around 65 percent and in the 60 and over age group, 37 percent.

Another interesting aspect of the finding is that Fidesz and Socialist party supporters hold similar, almost identical views on alternative medicine. Supporters of the nationalist Jobbik party, however, are much more inclined to reject mainstream medical practices than supporters of the other parties. Opposition Democratic Coalition seem to be the most satisfied with mainstream medical procedures, according to the survey.

Source: hungarianambiance.com/Závecz Research

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