soup, sour cherry
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Some Hungarian desserts are famous all over the world – just think of the Dobos cake or the cream cake (krémes). However, the lesser known cakes and pastries are just as delicious. One of the ingredients that appear in several of them is the sour cherry.

Sour cherry is the only fruit for which the Hungarian word we use today, namely, ‘meggy’, has Finno-Ugric origins, suggesting that Hungarians have known about this fruit since before conquering the Carpathian Basin. Hungary has a wide variety of sour cherry trees, producing different kinds of cherries, which could mean introducing the fruit to the European cuisine started in Hungary.

Hungarian strudel

rétes, meggy
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When you hear the word strudel, you might think of the Austrian apple strudel that is also among the world’s 100 most famous foods.

However, Hungarians have their own version that is just as special and delicious. It first appeared presumably in the 17th century, with the first written document dating back to 1696, and spread in the Habsburg Empire in the 18th century.

There are many varieties to the Hungarian strudel. You can make it with a number of fillings, including cottage cheese, poppy seed, walnut, sour cherry and any combination of these.

Click HERE to make the recipe at home.

 

Sour cherry soup

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Sour cherry soup is the perfect soup choice for the warm spring and summer days as it is usually served cold, occasionally with the addition of cream, whipped cream or even vanilla ice cream. Sour cherry soup is a known dish in the neighbouring countries, too, such as Austria, Slovakia or Poland, but it also made its way to America and Canada, thanks to Hungarian emigrants. Recipes vary from household to household, but it is a safe bet if you try and follow THIS recipe.

Cognac sour cherry

bonbon, sweets
Cognac sour cherry
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Cognac sour cherry is an old Hungarian bonbon, first made in 1886 by Emil Gerbeaud, descendent of the famous confectioner dynasty. It is actually not too difficult to make at home, although it does take long until you can get a taste of the finished product. However, all you need is some sour cherries, cognac, fondant and chocolate. The sour cherries are meant to soak in the cognac for about four weeks. Then, you have to make the chocolate shell, add the sour cherry and the fondant, then let it set for about a week. The upside of making it at home is you can vary the amount of cognac and fondant, and you can try making the shell from white chocolate, too, for example.

Lúdláb cake

recipe, ludlab, dessert
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Certain Hungarian foods have rather unique and curious names. Lúdláb cake, meaning ‘goosefoot’, is one such example. There are several theories about the origins of the name. It could be related to its shape, the triangles this cake is usually served in that are wider than regular slices of cake. Another option is that it used to be connected to Saint Martin’s Day celebrations. Whatever the reason, this dessert with the wonderful mixture of chocolate and sour cherries is delicious and definitely worth trying out.

For the recipe to try at home, click HERE.

Punch cake

dessert, cake
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Sour cherry can come in many shapes and forms, it is actually a favourite preserve that many Hungarian households prepare each year. It can also be made into jam, and it is this form that is used when making a lovely punch cake. Even though only a thin layer of the jam is used for the cake, it is an integral part of the cake. Not to mention how the characteristic pink colour is achieved by adding sour cherry juice to the glaze.

For the recipe to make at home, click HERE.

Featured image: facebook.com/olivaetterempecs/photos

https://dailynewshungary.com/favourite-hungarian-ingredients-poppy-seed/

Source: Daily News Hungary

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