Select Page

Moscow proposes international co-operation against the Ukrainian Education Law

Moscow proposes international co-operation against the Ukrainian Education Law

The Russian foreign ministry called for an international co-operation against the Ukrainian education law, which according to the ministry, violates the rights of millions of ethnic Russians, and it is contrary to Ukraine’s constitution and Kiev’s international commitments.

Although the law does not mention specifically the Russian language, but

it is clear that the main purpose of Ukrainian legislators is to abolish the rights of millions of ethnic Russians in Ukraine and to introduce a single language system in a multi-ethnic state,

said the statement issued by the Russian foreign ministry on Tuesday.

The statement stressed that “this move is an attempt by ‘Maidan’ actors to implement a full scale Ukrainization of the country’s education system, which is in direct opposition to both the country’s constitution and Kiev’s international obligations in the humanitarian sphere.”

The ministry has pointed out that the law was sharply criticised by the Hungarian, Polish and Romanian governments, as well as Moldovan President Igor Dodon.

Moscow has called for a joint action against the language law.

“We are convinced that collective efforts are needed, among other things, in the forums of international organisations in order to overcome Ukrainian authorities’ policies that violate general human rights standards”, the statement said.

As we wrote before, the Hungarian government has strenuously protested a recent education law passed by Ukraine’s parliament. Also the government is to call on the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the UN and the EU Commissioner for neighbourhood policy and enlargement negotiations to act on the Ukrainian education bill curbing the right to minority language education.

Source: MTI – hungarianambiance.com

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Eastern Europe Top 10 September 14th – The Vostokian - […] prompted fears of Russian prosecution following the EuroMaidan protests of 2013, which explains why Russia is jumping on the…

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.

Newsletter

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Recommended

Pin It on Pinterest